New Diplomatic History

investigating diplomacy as an extension of social interests, forces, and environments

News

Diplomatica 2(2): Gift and Tribute in Early Modern Diplomacy: Afro-Eurasian Perspectives. Guest-edited by Birgit Tremml-Werner, Lisa Hellman and Guido van Meersbergen

Gifts and tribute are a hot topic in studies of early modern diplomacy, resulting in much stimulating new work on diplomatic exchanges particularly in a global context. The special issue “Gift and Tribute in Early Modern Diplomacy: Afro-Eurasian Perspectives” expands on this ongoing shift towards a global, multicentric perspective by using gift-giving as the lens through which to analyse a diverse set of inter-polity relations spanning the continents of Africa, Europe and Asia. It illuminates the role of gifts and tribute as key agents in imperial expansion, conflict management, and the negotiation of protection and patronage in different parts of the world. It also emphasises that to achieve a truly global perspective on the development of diplomatic norms and practices, concerted collaborative analysis from scholars with different linguistic, disciplinary, and subject expertise is needed…

New UNESCO Project

A new project is underway in Sweden that examines the expansion of international society in the twentieth century by way of digital analysis of discourse in UNESCO. More information on the project may be found on its website.

New Podcasts

Three new podcasts are now available: the first, with Victoria Phillips from Columbia University, on Martha Graham; the second, with Johan Galtung, on diplomacy, civilisation, and peace; and the third, with Jeremy Black, from the University of Exeter, on histories of diplomacy and foreign policy. All three recordings may be found on our podcasts page. Listeners may also rate and subscribe to them on Apple podcasts, Soundcloud, and Spotify.

Some Recent Articles of Note

John Krige, ‘Technodiplomacy: A Concept and Its Application to U.S.-France Nuclear Weapons Cooperation in the Nixon-Kissinger Era’ Federal History Issue 12, 2020.

T. G. Otte, ‘The Inner Circle: What is Diplomatic History? (And Why We Should Study It)’ History January 2020 https://doi.org/10.1111/1468-229X.12925 reviewed by Ken Weisbrode, here: bit.ly/2W1jkQC

Gemma Allen, ‘The Rise of the Ambassadress: English Ambassadorial Wives and Early Modern Diplomatic Culture’, The Historical Journal September 2019 https://doi.org/10.1017/S0018246X1800016X

Barbara Keys, ‘The Diplomat’s Two Minds: Deconstructing a Foreign Policy Myth’, Diplomatic History November 2019 https://doi.org/10.1093/dh/dhz053

David E. Banks, ‘Fields of Practice: Symbolic Binding and the Qing Defense of Sinocentric Diplomacy’, International Studies Quarterly July 2019 https://doi.org/10.1093/isq/sqz054

Deepak Nair, ‘Saving Face in Diplomacy: A Political Sociology of Face-to-Face Interactions in ASEAN’, European Journal of International Relations January 2019.

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