CFP: Neutrality

Posted by Kenneth Weisbrode in Uncategorized · Comments ( 0 )

from Pascal Lottaz:

2017 Neutrality Conference

​– Lessons from the Past and Visions for the 21st Century – International Conference at Complutense University, Madrid October 27 & 28, 2017

Call for Papers
​War and Peace have influenced novelists, social scientists, historians, and philosophers over centuries. Neutrality – the state of being at peace with those who are at war – on the other hand, not that much. Then again, ever since the Peloponnesian wars, we have records of polities and thinkers who remained committed to the idea of the right not to choose sides. Recent research in the fields of International Law, International Relations and History have produced many insights on the importance of neutrality during the long 19th century and many valuable studies have been conducted on neutrals during the World Wars and even into the Cold War. But how do these periods relate to each other? What do we know about the development of neutrality itself and where does this leave us in the 21st Century?

The international conference on October 27th and 28th 2017 is aimed at finding answers to these questions. We wish to illuminate all aspects regarding the development of the concept of neutrality over the past centuries as well as the most recent changes that we are witnessing today. By bringing together experts from around the world, this conference has the dual goal of exploring the above questions and serving as a starting point for a network of researchers committed to the intellectual exploration of neutrality.

We invite all researchers with an interest in the dynamics of neutrality to apply to the conference by submitting a paper/presentation abstract of maximum 200 words.

Application
Applications and inquiries should be emailed to neutralityconference@ucm.es
Deadline for applications is June 30, 2017
Applications will be screened by an academic committee. Acceptance of the conference will be informed by mid-July

Required Information:

Full Name
Title
Affiliation
Country
Telephone
eMail
Abstract of 200 words

Gender and the League of Nations

Posted by Kenneth Weisbrode in Uncategorized · Comments ( 0 )

From Haakon Ikonomou:

Myriam Piguet (MA student, Aarhus University) has written a great piece on gender
distribution in the League of Nations, and the differences between ambitions and
reality in the early years of the Secretariat.

You will find the latest ‘The Invention of International Bureaucracy’-blog here:

http://projects.au.dk/inventingbureaucracy/blog/show/artikel/gender-distribution-in-the-league-of-nations-the-start-of-a-revolution/

Call for Papers: Music Diplomacy

Posted by Kenneth Weisbrode in New Diplomatic History Announcements, Uncategorized · Comments ( 0 )

Popular Music and Public Diplomacy Technische Universität Dortmund, Germany 6-8 November 2015
Call for Papers
In the early years of the Cold War, Western nations increasingly turned towards popular music in their public diplomacy. While the diplomatic use of popular music was initially limited to such genres as jazz and gospel, the second half of the twentieth century saw a growing presence of various popular genres in diplomatic contexts, including country, bluegrass, rock, punk, reggae, and hip-hop. As an instrument of public diplomacy, popular music plays a complex role in contested terrain. Whether it functions as cultural subversion, as a reaffirmation of cultural hegemony, or as a combination of both is conditioned by a web of interdependent factors ranging from the music itself to its mediation and appropriation in different contexts.

Music diplomacy has not only impacted the ways in which audiences perceive foreign cultures, but it has also helped to shape the cultural horizons of politicians, diplomats, cultural managers, journalists, and musicians involved in diplomatic programs. In this way, music diplomacy has had highly significant cultural and aesthetic effects. The musicians’ role as their countries’ cultural ambassadors, for instance, had the potential to lead to radical transformations in the way they were perceived at home, forcing them to reconfigure their rhetorical and musical legitimation as artists. In a way, the diplomatic usability of musicians as ambassadors is an aesthetic and performative benchmark by means of which artists have re-defined themselves and their work. International cultural exchange with local musicians in host countries likewise inspired musical ambassadors to venture into previously unknown musical and cultural territories, thus impacting their aesthetics and oeuvres.

This conference seeks to illuminate the diplomatic function of popular music from a transnational and transdisciplinary perspective, accentuating its interconnectivity and dissemination across national borders. We are particularly interested in the nexus of power, popularity, aesthetics, and cultural exchange. How did popular music function in the ideological conflict between East and West, for instance, and how did its function change after the fall of the Iron Curtain? How did U.S. popular music programs interact with other nations’ initiatives to channel their self-representation through popular music? Who are the agents, stakeholders, and gatekeepers of popular music diplomacy? What is the role of celebrity in music diplomacy? Has popular music been an “efficient” instrument of national and communal self-representation and how do institutions measure its efficiency?

Proposals:
We invite contributions from a variety of disciplines, including cultural studies, musicology, ethnomusicology, political science, diplomacy studies, history, sociology, literature, international relations, and other relevant fields. Proposals should include a title, 250 word abstract, technical requirements, and short biographical sketch. Please submit your proposal by 1 April 2015 to musicaldiplomacy2015@gmail.com.

Keynote speakers include Martha Bayles (Boston College, U.S.) and Klaus Nathaus (University of Oslo, Norway). The conference is hosted by the Department of English and American Studies as well as the Department of Music and Musicology at TU Dortmund University, Germany.

Organizing Committee: Mario Dunkel (TU Dortmund University, Germany) Sina Nitzsche (TU Dortmund University, Germany)