New journal issue: The Global Embassy

Posted by Kenneth Weisbrode in New Diplomatic History Announcements · Comments ( 0 )

We are happy to direct your attention to the latest issue of New Global Studies, which features some of the papers from our second conference held last fall in Copenhagen.

The issue was guest edited Giles Scott-Smith, and may be seen by clicking the above link from the journal’s title, or by pasting this address in your browser: https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/ngs.2017.11.issue-2/issue-files/ngs.2017.11.issue-2.xml

As always, we welcome your thoughts and comments.

Le Corbusier and the Idea of a Palace

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from Haakon Ikonomou:

What’s in a name? Marco Ninno (MA Student, Aarhus University) has written an intriguing piece on how the word ‘palace’ fundamentally influenced the search for an architect for the new League headquarters in Geneva, in this month’s blog post: A modernist in Geneva – Le Corbusier and the competition for the Palais des Nations.

You will find it here:
http://projects.au.dk/inventingbureaucracy/blog/show/artikel/a-modernist-in-geneva-le-corbusier-and-the-competition-for-the-palais-des-nations/

History of the Limited Test Ban Treaty: The Role of ACDA

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An interesting first-hand account by retired U.S. ambassador James E. Goodby of the origins and role of the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency in shepherding the Limited Test Ban Treaty may be found on the Hoover Institution’s website, here. This is the abstract:

“Public policy issues involving a complex mix of problems, exemplified today by climate change and the threat of nuclear war, require governance by institutions whose mandates and cultures embrace technological expertise as well as diplomatic and military skills. This paper is a case study of how such an institution operated during the Kennedy Administration to deal with the growing threat of radioactive debris in the environment and the threat of nuclear proliferation, and also put US-Soviet relations on a new trajectory. The 1963 Limited Test Ban Treaty might not have been concluded during the Kennedy Administration had the US Arms Control and Disarmament Agency not been established in 1961.”

Denmark and the League

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from Haakon Ikonomou:

Søren Friis (PhD Student, Aarhus University) has written a fascinating piece on
Denmark and the Early Years of International Studies under the League of Nations,
exploring some of the formative networks of so-called ‘intellectual cooperation’ in
the interwar years.

You will find the latest ‘The Invention of International Bureaucracy’-blog here:
http://projects.au.dk/inventingbureaucracy/blog/show/artikel/the-scandinavian-center-denmark-and-the-early-years-of-international-studies-under-the-league-of-na/

CFP: Neutrality

Posted by Kenneth Weisbrode in New Diplomatic History Announcements · Comments ( 0 )

from Pascal Lottaz:

2017 Neutrality Conference

​– Lessons from the Past and Visions for the 21st Century – International Conference at Complutense University, Madrid October 27 & 28, 2017

Call for Papers
​War and Peace have influenced novelists, social scientists, historians, and philosophers over centuries. Neutrality – the state of being at peace with those who are at war – on the other hand, not that much. Then again, ever since the Peloponnesian wars, we have records of polities and thinkers who remained committed to the idea of the right not to choose sides. Recent research in the fields of International Law, International Relations and History have produced many insights on the importance of neutrality during the long 19th century and many valuable studies have been conducted on neutrals during the World Wars and even into the Cold War. But how do these periods relate to each other? What do we know about the development of neutrality itself and where does this leave us in the 21st Century?

The international conference on October 27th and 28th 2017 is aimed at finding answers to these questions. We wish to illuminate all aspects regarding the development of the concept of neutrality over the past centuries as well as the most recent changes that we are witnessing today. By bringing together experts from around the world, this conference has the dual goal of exploring the above questions and serving as a starting point for a network of researchers committed to the intellectual exploration of neutrality.

We invite all researchers with an interest in the dynamics of neutrality to apply to the conference by submitting a paper/presentation abstract of maximum 200 words.

Application
Applications and inquiries should be emailed to neutralityconference@ucm.es
Deadline for applications is June 30, 2017
Applications will be screened by an academic committee. Acceptance of the conference will be informed by mid-July

Required Information:

Full Name
Title
Affiliation
Country
Telephone
eMail
Abstract of 200 words

“Fake News”

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from Haakon Ikonomou:

Emil Eiby Seidenfaden (PhD Student, Aarhus University) has written a timely and intriguing piece on The League and the Combating of ‘False Information’, digging into the interwar discussions on what to do with Fake News.

You will find the latest ‘The Invention of International Bureaucracy’-blog here:

http://projects.au.dk/inventingbureaucracy/blog/show/artikel/the-league-and-the-combating-of-false-information/

CFP: Conflict Management and Modern Diplomacy (1500-1914)

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Call for Papers
Conflict Management in Modern Diplomacy (1500-1914)
8-10 February 2018
Institut für Geschichte / History Department, University of Vienna

Conflict management was a genuine task of modern diplomacy, from its very beginnings in the 16th century onwards. In spite of the fact that diplomatic history has undergone an important renewal in the past decades, evolving from a history of institutions towards actor-based and intercultural history, conflicts – if addressed at all – are still regarded as the dysfunctional side of diplomacy.

The conference, which is organised by the research group “Diplomacy in Conflict”, focuses on conflict management as the constant processes of mediation and negotiation, which included efforts but also resistance, success but also failure.

Diplomatic contacts were not only destined to resolve political or military conflicts, but could also be highly conflictual themselves, due to cultural differences, such as incompatible codes or stereotypes.

Diplomatic strategies comprised the avoidance and resolution of conflicts as well as their deliberate escalation or provocation. Furthermore, since the end of the 18th century, cultural conflicts became increasingly charged with national connotations.

The conference is aimed to discuss the changing strategies and modes of conflict management within modern diplomacy in order to provide a deeper understanding of diplomatic processes. We welcome papers addressing private as well as public spheres, official as well as unofficial participants, and European as well as Non-European players.

Prospective speakers are invited to submit abstracts of approximately 300 words. Submissions should include name, affiliation and contact details. The deadline for submissions is 15 June 2017.

For more information about the conference, or to submit an abstract, please email the organisers at dorothea.nolde@univie.ac.at or julia.gebke@univie.ac.at.

We intend to publish the conference papers.

Translators in the League

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from Haakon Ikonomou:

The latest blogpost of the “The Invention of International Bureaucracy” project concerns the Translation and Interpretation Service of the League Secretariat, and how they contributed, quite literally, to the common understanding of those showing up in Geneva. Interestingly, they hold a prominent place in the early memoirs and academic works of former League staff, as the truest internationalists of the Secretariat.

http://projects.au.dk/inventingbureaucracy/blog/show/artikel/an-international-language-the-translation-and-interpretation-service/

Gender and the League of Nations

Posted by Kenneth Weisbrode in New Diplomatic History Blog · Comments ( 0 )

From Haakon Ikonomou:

Myriam Piguet (MA student, Aarhus University) has written a great piece on gender
distribution in the League of Nations, and the differences between ambitions and
reality in the early years of the Secretariat.

You will find the latest ‘The Invention of International Bureaucracy’-blog here:

http://projects.au.dk/inventingbureaucracy/blog/show/artikel/gender-distribution-in-the-league-of-nations-the-start-of-a-revolution/